The Official Google Blog

Introducing the Measure Tool for Google Earth on Chrome and Android (lun., 25 juin 2018)
Ever wonder how far your hometown is from the North Pole? Or maybe, you simply want to measure the length of that hike  you just finished. One of the most requested features for Google Earth is the ability to measure distance and areas. So today, we're adding a Measure Tool, available on Chrome today,  Android this week and iOS is coming soon. Check out a few ways to use the tool: Measurement Measuring distance and area on Android Measure Looking to buy a home? Check the size of the park in the neighborhood you have your eye on. Measure If you're a teacher, use the map to create math problems - and challenge your students to find out which is bigger - Colorado or Utah? (without Googling it!) Measure Image 4 Measure Now it’s your turn to test your soccer mapping skills. How big is this football stadium? And who’s going to take first place?!

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Building the workforce of the future: key learnings from Grow with Google (lun., 25 juin 2018)
The world is rapidly digitizing, presenting huge opportunities for growth and jobs. However, many people in Europe and beyond lack the skills to take advantage of this. Inspired by the European Commission’s call for ideas to address this challenge—we committed to help, launching Grow with Google three years ago. Since then more than 4 million people in Europe and 3 million people in Africa have been through our programs, and in Europe, Grow with Google has created more than 220,000 new jobs or business opportunities. This March, we renewed our commitment to the EU Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, with a pledge to help a further one million people in Europe find a job or grow their business by 2020. The digital skills challenge is one that many organizations and governments are focused on, and we want to share what we’ve learned. We asked the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) to independently review Grow with Google's approach to digital skills training. They looked at six countries: France, Germany, Italy, Nigeria, Spain and Sweden. Here’s what they found: Partnership between companies, government and civil society is vital. Our partnerships with governments, city councils, universities, private-sector businesses and nonprofits have enabled us to gain trust with participants, learn from others' expertise, and increase the reach and relevance of our programs. In Italy, Crescere in Digitale, a partnership with the Ministry of Labour and Chamber of Commerce, has initiated more than 3,000 internships for young unemployed people at SMBs to date. About 30 percent of those who completed internships are now employed. Programs must be tailored to meet local contexts and needs. A “one size fits all” format is unlikely to work well. Programs need to be designed to meet national needs and often work best when there is scope for further local tailoring. Grow with Google is localized in each country, working with local partners, to maximize relevance and results. In Spain, where unemployment is the biggest issue affecting youth, we recently launched a digital skills employment program with the government. In Greece, where tourism is the top economic pillar, we’ve partnered with the government to offer free digital skills training to people working in the tourism sector.   Providing skills for the future is as important as providing skills for immediate use. Organizations and people need skills to help improve short-term outcomes. However, future-proofing the workforce is as important as bridging the digital skills gap now. As the demand for a specific skill set is continuously changing, we’ve added new components to our trainings, expanding the initial digital marketing modules with new content on privacy and security, as well as soft business skills. In parallel, we always strive to keep our training materials up to date with emerging topics such as machine learning. Programs should address the needs of a diverse audience and challenge traditional assumptions. Many people assume that it’s mostly young men who are interested in learning about digital. Our experience has taught us that this is not the case: More than 40 percent of the people who have taken our training so far are women. In Germany, we continue to work with Fraunhofer IAIS on their Open Roberta program, teaching young women how to code. Our trainings are also suitable for a wide range of age groups—from students to pensioners—and challenge the preconception that unemployed people are unlikely to become digital experts. In Sweden we’ve developed training with the National Employment Agency to help unemployed people learn to build a web presence, use Search to find jobs, get tips to enhance their CV, and use social media. Platform agnosticism is important. Grow with Google lessons not only cover Google products and services, but also products and tools offered by other providers. This means that the training is as current and relevant to participant needs as possible. These independent recommendations and others from IPPR are available on IPPR’s website, and will inform our digital skills work going forward. We hope they also provide useful guidance to our partners and other skills providers, governments and NGOs across the region who are all devoted to building the workforce of the future.

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Meet the 2018 Google News Initiative Journalism Fellows (ven., 22 juin 2018)
In 2013, we began a News Fellows program, as an investment in the next generation of digital reporters. The fellowship is an important part of the Google News Initiative’s commitment to strengthen the quality of journalism and empower news organizations to make use of technology, through pairing students interested in journalism and technology with prestigious media organizations around the world. Since its launch, the program has expanded into 12 regions with an alumni network of over 300 journalists and innovators across the world. This month, we welcomed the 2018 U.S. Google News Initiative Fellows to Mountain View ahead of their summer fellowships at journalism nonprofits across the country: YanWu.jpg Yan Wu, Northeastern University, Center for Investigative Reporting. Yan Wu is a designer and coder turned interactive storyteller. As a graphic intern at The Boston Globe, she had not only worked on projects like 11 months, 1 president, 2471 tweets independently, but also collaborated with the Pulitzer prize winning Spotlight team and other developers on the race series. JulieChristie.JPG Julie Christie, Temple University, Investigative Reporters & Editors. Julie Christie is almost a senior at Temple University in the Klein College of Media and Communication, where she's studying journalism. She's currently the Enterprise Editor at The Temple News, the university's independent student newspaper. MarleeBaldridge.jpg Marlee Baldridge, University of Missouri, Nieman Journalism Lab. Marlee is a senior studying entrepreneurial journalism at the University of Missouri. A native of Harrisburg, Missouri (population 289), she joined the inaugural Potter Digital Ambassador program and helped integrate sustainable video and social strategies into the reporting of a rural Missouri newspaper Pankhuri Kumar - Headshot.JPG Pankhuri Kumar, Columbia University, Pew. Pankhuri is currently completing a dual degree in Journalism and CS at Columbia University. With a math and CS background, she hopes to pursue a career in interactive and computational journalism. TaylorBlatchford headshot.jpg Taylor Blatchford, University of Missouri, Poynter. Taylor Blatchford graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in investigative and international journalism. She leads a team focused on bringing community engagement into the reporting process at the Columbia Missourian, a daily city newspaper. Riley_Wong_headshot_Jan2018_square.jpeg Riley Wong, University of Pennsylvania,ProPublica. Riley Wong conducts machine learning and data science research for healthcare. They graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2017 in computer science. Their passions include social impact, QTPOC community building, music, and art. CorinneOsnos.png Corinne Osnos, Northwestern University, Matter. Corinne is a graduate of Northwestern University, where she studied media innovation and entrepreneurship.  As a research assistant for The Membership Puzzle Project, Corinne performed UX research on public radio sites and is now conducting qualitative research on Burning Man. Erin_MCAWEENEY.jpg Erin McAweeney, University of Washington-Seattle,Witness. Erin is a researcher and technologist working in data journalism, information ethics, and algorithmic bias. In her undergrad she was an editor for a non-profit street paper that provided employment and an outlet for the marginalized homeless population in her community.

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With summer ahead, what the world searched for this week (ven., 22 juin 2018)
Each week, we take a look at the top trending topics in Search for a sense of what the world is thinking about. Here’s a look at a few of the trending searches this week—some playful and some serious—with data from the Google News Lab.  [Insert header pun here … punalty intended] This week, fans around the world put the Gooooooooooogle in goooooooooooal!, making the World Cup the single biggest topic in Search. Everybody loves a home team, but it’s Brazil that’s leading searches globally. Meh about the players but love the game? Get in on the action with “Drills and skills” videos on YouTube; their views have increased six times since the last FIFA World Cup. And you can keep track of all your favorite teams and players with Google Trends. The best part of the world’s best lasagna Amid searches for “best in the world,” the top contenders were “best soccer player in the world” (because World Cup, see above) and “best restaurants in the world,” since the list of top 50 restaurants in the world was released this week. Topping the list is an Italian eatery whose menu listings include “an eel swimming up the Po river” and “the crunchy part of the lasagna.” Clearly they’re onto something ... the top searched “world’s best” food is lasagna, which maybe you’d pair with the next item on the list, “world’s best beer.” The sun never sets on party ideas If you found that beer, hopefully you sipped it on it yesterday—it was summer solstice, the longest day of the year. And if that lager rendered you pensive, you may have joined those who wondered, “what is the summer solstice?” and, soberly, “when does summer end?” Perk up while the sun’s up: “summer solstice party ideas” was the top related query to the phenomenon, and no place searched for the solstice more than the U.K., where nearly 10,000 people gathered to celebrate at Stonehenge. Summer solstice playlist Queen Bey and the queen’s consort Jay-Z reign again, dropping a surprise album, “Everything Is Love,” last weekend. Search interest went up for both Bey and Jay in the U.S., 92 percent and 130 percent respectively, but Beyoncé was searched more than Jay-Z in every U.S. state. Jay-Z’s streaming platform Tidal also got its own wave of searches: interest in Tidal spiked 267 percent in the past week. The album release included a masterpiece of a music video at the Louvre, prompting people to search “How much does it cost to rent out the Louvre?” and “Where is the Mona Lisa?” Crisis at the border On a more serious note, the world turned its attention to the U.S.-Mexico border this week, as anger erupted over immigrant children being separated from their families and held at migrant detention centers. A viral photo of a young girl caused a 3000 percent spike in searches for “crying toddler at border.” Searches for the Secretary of Homeland Security spiked by over 5000 percent, as did searches for former First Lady Laura Bush, who spoke out against the separation. The top “how to help” questions this week were “How to help immigrant children?” and “How to help families separated at the border?” as people searched for ways to contribute.

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Get verified to manage your presence on Google (ven., 22 juin 2018)
When you search for well-known people, organizations and things on Google, you’ll often come across a Knowledge Panel on the results page—a box with an overview of key information and links to resources to help you go deeper. Individuals and organizations with Knowledge Panels can use our verification process to claim their panels and provide authoritative feedback on the information and images presented. Now we’re updating that process as well as extending verification eligibility to more entities. Any person, organization, sports team, event and media property with a Knowledge Panel is eligible to get verified and suggest edits to the information shown. Simply search for your name or organization on Search and click or tap the prompt below the Knowledge Panel to begin the verification process. Verified on Google Once you’re verified, you can suggest factual changes to information in your Knowledge Panel and suggest a featured image. You can learn more about how to provide this feedback in our help center. We're always working on ways to improve Search to ensure you find the most relevant, accurate information possible. We hope that by giving individuals and entities an improved way to help us get it right if something’s off, we get closer to that goal.

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