The Official Google Blog

A new pathway to roles in IT Support (mar., 16 janv. 2018)
Note : L'entrée du flux est défectueuse.

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Expanding our global infrastructure with new regions and subsea cables (mar., 16 janv. 2018)
At Google, we've spent $30 billion improving our infrastructure over three years, and we’re not done yet. From data centers to subsea cables, Google is committed to connecting the world and serving our Cloud customers, and today we’re excited to announce that we’re adding three new submarine cables, and five new regions. We’ll open our Netherlands and Montreal regions in the first quarter of 2018, followed by Los Angeles, Finland, and Hong Kong – with more to come. Then, in 2019 we’ll commission three subsea cables: Curie, a private cable connecting Chile to Los Angeles; Havfrue, a consortium cable connecting the U.S. to Denmark and Ireland; and the Hong Kong-Guam Cable system (HK-G), a consortium cable interconnecting major subsea communication hubs in Asia.   Together, these investments further improve our network—the world’s largest—which by some accounts delivers 25% of worldwide internet traffic. Companies like PayPal leverage our network and infrastructure to run their businesses effectively. “At PayPal, we process billions of transactions across the globe, and need to do so securely, instantaneously and economically. As a result, security, networking and infrastructure were key considerations for us when choosing a cloud provider,” said Sri Shivananda, PayPal’s Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer. “With Google Cloud, we have access to the world’s largest network, which helps us reach our infrastructure goals and best serve our millions of users.” infrastructure-1 Figure 1. Diagram shows existing GCP regions and upcoming GCP regions infrastructure-2 Figure 2. Diagram shows three new subsea cable investments, expanding capacity to Chile, Asia Pacific and across the Atlantic Curie cable Our investment in the Curie cable (named after renowned scientist Marie Curie) is part of our ongoing commitment to improve global infrastructure. In 2008, we were the first tech company to invest in a subsea cable as a part of a consortium. With Curie, we become the first major non-telecom company to build a private intercontinental cable. By deploying our own private subsea cable, we help improve global connectivity while providing value to our customers. Owning the cable ourselves has some distinct benefits. Since we control the design and construction process, we can fully define the cable’s technical specifications, streamline deployment and deliver service to users and customers faster. Also, once the cable is deployed, we can make routing decisions that optimize for latency and availability. Curie will be the first subsea cable to land in Chile in almost 20 years. Once deployed, Curie will be Chile’s largest single data pipe. It will serve Google users and customers across Latin America. Havfrue cable To increase capacity and resiliency in our North Atlantic systems, we’re working with Facebook, Aqua Comms and Bulk Infrastructure to build a direct submarine cable system connecting the U.S. to Denmark and Ireland. This cable, called Havfrue (Danish for “mermaid”), will be built by TE SubCom and is expected to come online by the end of 2019. The marine route survey, during which the supplier determines the specific route the cable will take, is already underway. HK-G cable In the Pacific, we’re working with RTI-C and NEC on the Hong Kong-Guam cable system. Together with Indigo and other existing subsea systems, this cable creates multiple scalable, diverse paths to Australia, increasing our resilience in the Pacific. As a result, customers will experience improved capacity and latency from Australia to major hubs in Asia. It will also increase our network capacity at our new Hong Kong region. infrastructure-3 Figure 3. A complete list of Google’s subsea cable investments. New cables in this announcement are highlighted yellow. Google subsea cables provide reliability, speed and security not available from any other cloud. Google has direct investment in 11 cables, including those planned or under construction. The three cables highlighted in yellow are being announced in this blog post. (In addition to these 11 cables where Google has direct ownership, we also lease capacity on numerous additional submarine cables.) What does this mean for our customers? These new investments expand our existing cloud network. The Google network has over 100 points of presence (map) and over 7,500 edge caching nodes (map). This investment means faster and more reliable connectivity for all our users. Simply put, it wouldn’t be possible to deliver products like Machine Learning Engine, Spanner, BigQuery and other Google Cloud Platform and G Suite services at the quality of service users expect without the Google network. Our cable systems provide the speed, capacity and reliability Google is known for worldwide, and at Google Cloud, our customers are able to to make use of the same network infrastructure that powers Google’s own services. While we haven’t hastened the speed of light, we have built a superior cloud network as a result of the well-provisioned direct paths between our cloud and end-users, as shown in the figure below. infrastructure-4 Figure 4. The Google network offers better reliability, speed and security performance as compared with the nondeterministic performance of the public internet, or other cloud networks. The Google network consists of fiber optic links and subsea cables between 100+ points of presence, 7500+ edge node locations, 90+ Cloud CDN  locations, 47 dedicated interconnect locations and 15 GCP regions. We’re excited about these improvements. We're increasing our commitment to ensure users have the best connections in this increasingly connected world.

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Eight things you need to know about Hash Code 2018 (mar., 16 janv. 2018)
Are you up for a coding challenge? Team up to solve an engineering problem from Google—registration for Hash Code 2018 is now open.   Hash Code is Google’s flagship team programming competition for students and professionals in  Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. You pick your team and programming language, we pick a Google engineering problem for you to solve. Thinking about competing in Hash Code? Here’s what you need to know before you sign up: 1. This is the fifth edition of Hash Code. Hash Code started in 2014 with just 200 participants. We’ve grown a bit since the early days—last year more than 26,000 developers teamed up to compete from 100+ countries across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. 2. Problems are modeled after Google engineering challenges. We want participants to experience what software engineering is like at Google, so we model Hash Code problems after challenges faced by Google engineering teams. Past problems have included optimizing video serving on YouTube, routing Street View cars through a busy city, and optimizing the layout of a Google data center.   3. You compete in a small team (just like engineers at Google!). To compete in Hash Code, you need to form a team of two to four people. This means it’s not just about what you know individually, but about how you and your team can work together to tackle the problem. 4. Hash Code kicks off with an Online Qualification Round on Thursday, March 1. It all starts with a YouTube livestream at 18:30 CET sharp, after which the problem is released and teams have four hours to code.  5. Hubs add extra excitement to the Online Qualification Round. Hubs are meetups where teams in the same area can come together to compete in the Online Qualification Round. They’re also a great opportunity for you to connect with other developers in your community. More than 300 hubs have been registered so far, and it’s not too late to organize a hub if there isn’t one near you already. Some competitors in the 2017 Hash Code Online Qualification Round Some competitors having fun at a few of the hubs during the 2017 Hash Code Online Qualification Round. 6. The Final Round will be held at Google Dublin. Top teams from the Online Qualification Round will be invited to our European Headquarters in April to vie for the title of Hash Code 2018 Champion. 7. It's a competition—but it's also about having fun! As Ingrid von Glehn, a software engineer at Google London who is part of the Hash Code organizing team, puts it: “We design the problems to be challenging, but not intimidating. It’s important to us that everyone has fun while taking part.”  Join in on all the fun online through our Facebook event and G+ community, using the #hashcode tag. These channels are also great spaces to connect with other engineers and find team members. Hash Code 2018 8. You can register today. Ready to accept the challenge? Be sure to sign up before registration closes on February 26. *Featured image: Teams hard at work tackling our wireless router placement problem during 2017’s Final Round in Paris. 

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#teampixel community member Austin Cameron is living for the city (ven., 12 janv. 2018)
Happy New Year, Team Pixel! There are so many picture-worthy moments ahead. Helping us get started on 2018 photography is Pixel enthusiast and photographer @ustincameron. He’s a regular #teampixel contributor who’s working through a personal goal of shooting a photo a day for 1,000 days—with more than 700 already under his belt!    He has a talent for shooting in low light, so we reached out to get some tips and find out more about his approach to shooting the nation's most popular cities. “Cityscapes are a fun challenge,” Austin says. “For most people, the skyline is already iconic, so I like to try and make them do a double take by showcasing it from an entirely different perspective than previously recognized.” teampixel112 (1).jpg New York, NY; Los Angeles, CA teampixel112.jpg Louisville, KY; Chicago, IL teampixel112 (2).jpg Chicago, IL; New York, NY 4.jpg San Francisco, CA @ustincameron’s tips for shooting in low light situations: Do your best to prevent light pollution from entering your frame. Make sure to set the focus on dark areas with details you want to bring out. Don’t be scared to lay on the ground for the perfect shot! Keep tagging your photos with #teampixel and you might be featured next.

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The High Five: you get a search, you get a search, everybody gets a search! (ven., 12 janv. 2018)
Oprah’s speech had people buzzing, while Jimmy Ma spun to internet fame at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships. Here are some of the most-searched trends of the week (with data from the Google News Lab). A brighter morning, even during our darkest nights “Is Oprah going to run for president?” was a top searched question this week, after the icon’s rousing speech at the Golden Globes. Searches for “Oprah for President” were up more than 5,000 percent, and search interest in “Oprah 2020” was 1,200 percent higher than “Trump 2020.” And the region with the most searches for “Oprah 2020”? Home of the White House, Washington, D.C. Making waves The recent raw water trend has people wondering whether drinking untreated water is actually good for you, and search queries poured in: “How is well water different from raw water?” “Who endorses raw water?” and “How much does raw water cost?” This week, searches in “raw water” were 800 percent higher than “raw milk” and 300 percent higher than “raw food.” Roll tide Alabama Crimson Tide freshman quarterback Tua Tagovailoa had his moment in the search spotlight this week. After leading his team to an overtime victory in the College Football Playoff National Championship, searches for his name increased nearly 7,000 percent, and searches are interested in his names, his stats, and his hands (which are reportedly quite large, and were searched 450 percent more than famously large-handed NFL quarterback Russell Wilson). Ice skating turns up Search interest in figure skater Jimmy Ma jumped 1,300 percent this week after he brought hip hop to the ice skating rink. His routine at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships featured Lil Jon’s hit song “Turn Down for What,” prompting these top searches: “Jimmy Ma freestyle,” “Jimmy Ma goes viral,” and “Jimmy Ma hiphop ice skating routine.” What happens in Vegas … Will stay in tech news. The Consumer Electronics Show (CES), which showcases future tech products, took place in Las Vegas this week. Some technical difficulties meant that “CES power outage” was searched 150 percent more than “CES news.” Other top searches about the event were “When is CES 2018?” “What does CES stand for?” and “How to go to CES.”

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